Back
 


• To have children create, perform and make critical judgements
   about artistic productions in order to add an artistic dimension
   to their daily life.
• To encourage participants to think about vital natural spaces
   for wildlife, and the components of specific environments.

Colour is part of our lives.
Look at the ways we can see and understand colour.

• To teach children about colour theory and its vocabulary.
• To introduce participants to new art concepts and vocabulary.
• To use the visual arts as a form of communication.
• To give participants an opportunity to create art
• To show them how to apply colour and design elements
   to specific project.
• To have them work with new materials, techniques
   and processes.
• To have them relate colour and design to the themes
   in All Nothing.
• To have participants share their art and their opinions
   with others.
• To invite children to think about vital natural spaces
   for wildlife, and the components that support life
   in specific environments.

 


PLANE
Each of the surface areas, usually vertical, representing distance or depth in a scene, either real or represented (in a drawing, painting or photography).

FOREGROUND
In a painting, photograph or other image, the part of the image that appears nearest to the observer and that contains people, objects or features that attract the most attention.
There is a beluga in the foreground.

MIDDLE GROUND
The part of an image or view that is neither very near nor very far away.
From the top of the hill we could see the ocean and, in the middle distance, the village.

BACKGROUND
The part of an image that appears farthest away, generally containing features that are less important than the main subject.
The artist did not paint the backgrounds to his pictures himself; his students did.
She has photographed them against many different backgrounds.
The scene was filmed against a background of dark fir trees.


 

Preliminary Activity #5: What is a Set?
- No materials required.

Activity #5: Designing a Set or a Background

- Recycled board
- Pencil, eraser
- Paint (brushes and/or sponges, water containers, paper towels), markers, crayons,
   oil pastels (alone or in combination)

 
Preliminary Activity #5:
What is a Set?


Group discussion
A theatre set or scenery provides information for the audience and creates atmosphere for the actors (puppeteers) to bring their story to life. Knowing what information you want the audience to have, you can design scenery that will give them a glimpse into the world your puppet characters inhabit.

The background is the largest part of the set. It usually creates the illusion of a room or an open space outdoors.

Discuss notions of foreground, middle ground and background.
- Objects that you want to appear farther
   away should be smaller, less colourful,
   less detailed and higher in the picture plane
   (higher up in the composition).
- Objects that you want to appear closer
   should be bigger, painted in brighter colours,
   more detailed and placed lower on the
   picture plane (lower in the composition).
- What kind of information do you want the
   audience to have?
- What will your set look like?
- How will you make sure that the puppets
   in the foreground stand out?
- Will the background be realistic or abstract?
- What colours will you use? Why?
- Will the backdrop have many details?
- How will the scenery enhance your story?


Activity #5:
Designing a Set or a Background


Materials
- Recycled board
- Pencil, eraser
- Paint (brushes and/or sponges, water containers, paper towels), markers, crayons,
   oil pastels (alone or in combination)

Use a large piece of recycled board or cardboard (Call a furniture or home improvement store to ask if they would be willing to donate materials for your set).

Use a pencil to quickly sketch out the design. Remember the background is just that. You should not put in too many details: you want the puppets in the foreground to stand out.

Using paint, pastels, crayons or a combination of those, colour the scenery. With paint you can use sponges to cover big areas quickly and evenly. You can do the same with crayons and pastels by turning them on their sides. Add important details at the end.

NEXT ACTIVITY  >>>



Your suggestions:
Share your comments with us

Name:
Email:
School:
Grade:
Title of your comments: 

Comments: